Sea changes could affect millions

June 18, 2010

If you’re worried about the impact of the oil spill in the Gulf, consider this new report by UNC marine scientist John Bruno and colleagues, showing that unprecedented, far-reaching impacts of climate change on the oceans could affect millions of people. Published in Science.  Details here.

Advertisements

Studying marine life forms near Gulf oil spill

June 14, 2010

Luke McKay, right, taking sediment cores aboard a research vessel near the spill site

UNC marine microbiologist Andreas Teske and doctoral student Luke McKay are searching the Gulf for life forms that could shed light on the impact of the oil spill and be helpful in the clean-up.

Using dozens of water and sediment samples taken in the Gulf in the wake of the BP spill, Teske and his team are conducting various experiments, such as identifying which microbes are present and how they are responding to the spill.They are collaborating with colleagues at UNC and elsewhere to propose various novel “rapid response” projects that could play a role in monitoring and tackling the spill disaster.

McKay and several graduate students have been working in the Gulf on research expeditions studying the spill and the surrounding area.  McKay was aboard one of the first research expeditions to visit the site and surrounding waters shortly after the spill began to unfold. He sent several days on the RV Pelican in early May, helping gather water and sediment samples.

See more details and photos in the News and Observer.

Click here for details on what Teske, McKay and other UNC scientists are doing to understand and address the Gulf oil spill.


Understanding oil spill plumes

June 9, 2010

UNC College Professors Rich McLaughlin and Roberto Camassa explained on CNN how oil forms plumes under the surface, and why it’s a problem. Click here for the video.


Wind Power, Rwanda Revisited and Facing the Past

March 25, 2010

 In this issue of our periodic e-news,  you can read about:

• Marine scientists Harvey Seim and Pete Peterson, who conducted research with the assistance of undergraduates, showing that North Carolina could derive 20 percent of its energy from wind power.

• Donna LeFebvre and 20 undergraduates, who traveled to Africa last summer to confront the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda They learned about hope from the survivors.

• Minrose Gwin, a prominent southern literature scholar, whose first novel explores the segregated south of the past. Her book has been compared favorably with To Kill a Mockingbird.

Click here to read online.


Carolina Arts and Sciences magazine online

February 25, 2010

PlayMakers Reaches Out, Football Fallout, Hotel Rwanda Revisited….  

These stories and more are available in the Spring 2010 issue of Carolina Arts and Sciences magazine. Our semi-annual publication is mailed to faculty, alumni and friends who have made a gift to the College, and is available to all online.


Taylor Branch talks about secret Clinton tapes, Feb. 23

February 9, 2010

UNC College alumnus Taylor Branch ’68 will discuss his book  The Clinton Tapes at UNC Wilson Library Special Collection on Feb. 23 at 5 pm. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Martin Luther King biographer was invited to record a series of secret White House conversations with Bill Clinton from 1993 to 2001. The President kept the tapes, but the historian published his recollections of what was said, based on his personal notes and recordings made on the drive home. The result is a fascinating though complicated glimpse of an irrepressible politiciain’s perpsective on our time.

Branch’s tapes, transcripts and notes are available to researchers through the University Library’s Southern Historical Collection.  He returns to his alma mater this month to talk about it all.

Details: http://bit.ly/9uorti


UNC’s living laboratory in the Galapagos

October 14, 2009

UNC and partners at the University of San Francisco – Quito, Ecuador, are developing a living laboratory to prevent ecological damage in the fragile Galapagos Islands. Learn more.